5 Tips For Writing A Traffic-Inducing Teaser Post

In Tips & Tricks by Susan Maccarelli | |

5 Tips For Writing A Traffic-Inducing Teaser Post - A teaser post is a post on your blog, that redirects the reader to another site. The idea is that when you have your work featured on another site, you can write a short post on your own blog to send readers to the place where your work has been featured.

What is a teaser post and why would I want to write one?

A teaser post is a post on your blog, that redirects the reader to another site.  The idea is that when you have your work featured on another site, you can write a short post on your own blog to send readers to the place where your work has been featured.

It’s a great idea for a couple of reasons.  It gives you a little bit of new content for your site as well as a way to announce to your readers that you have been featured (mild bragging is acceptable now and then).

More importantly, it shows the site that has featured your writing that you are excited to be there, and are doing all you can to promote it, and send traffic their way.  Whether it’s a guest post on Jane Blogger’s site about your favorite color of yarn, or a feature on The Huffington Post with thousands of eyes on it, a teaser post is a great way to stand out to your host as a blogger who is willing to go above and beyond to show your appreciation.  Some might call it brown-nosing, I like to think of it as good blogging manners.

Here are a few guidelines to follow when crafting your teaser posts:

5 Tips For Writing A Traffic-Inducing Teaser Post

1.  Keep It Short

Your teaser post should be short and sweet.  You are sending them to read more of your writing, so you don’t want to use up too much of their reading stamina before they get there.

2.  Reveal Just Enough To Entice

Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free?  Your teaser post should not give them the milk.  Instead, tell them about where they can go to get the milk, and how tasty and delicious it is going to be.  The real prize is the post you are sending them to.  A question at the beginning or end of your teaser can sometimes be effective if used well.

3.  Easy On The Duplication

Your teaser post should not be just the first three paragraphs of the post you are sending them to.  They don’t want to click over only to have to read through what they just read again, trying to find where they left off.

4.  Include A Call To Action

Of course you will include a link to the post, but be sure to also include the name of the site, and maybe even a word or two about them.  Something like: “I’m really excited to be featured on In The Powder Room today.  I look forward to my little dose of women’s humor there every day and usually have to stifle my laugh-snort before I finish reading.  I’m attempting to earn my stripes there today!”.  That gives the reader an idea about the site you are sending them to, in case they want to check out more while they are there.

5.  Don’t Gush Too Much

For instance, “I am SOOOOOOO thrilled and elated to be featured on XYZ today.  This has been my dream since I started blogging and I have finally achieved it!  I’d like to thank blah, blah, blah…”.  While it’s fine to express your excitement at being featured on a site you love, going overboard may cause other bloggers to want to give you a cyber slap (I’ve heard).  Your non-blogger readers may not know the rank of the site in the blogosphere and will question if this is the equivalent of a blogging Oscar, or if you are just full of yourself.  I’m pretty sure I have done it myself before, so learn from my mistakes.

There are lots of ways to do teaser posts, and I have rounded up a few that sent me clicking over to read their full post on another site for you to check out:

Teaser Post Examples

Feel free to leave a link in the comments to your own favorite teaser post as a reference for readers.


About the Author

Susan Maccarelli

Susan Maccarelli is the creator of Beyond Your Blog, a site helping bloggers successfully submit their writing for publishing opportunities beyond their personal blogs. She also offers online training and consulting to new bloggers looking for direction on submitting their writing for publication. Susan has interviewed dozens of editors from publications like The New York Times, Huffington Post, Brain, Child, Chicken Soup For The Soul, The Washington Post, and speaks at many respected writing and blogging conferences.