21 Writing Submission Tips from 21 Beyond Your Blog Posts

In Lists and Round Ups, Tips & Tricks by Susan Maccarelli | | 2 Comments

21 Writing Submission Tips From 21 Beyond Your Blog Posts

We are hitting the 21 post mark this week at Beyond Your Blog.  In honor of making it this far (baby steps), I’m sharing 21 tips for submitting your writing in case you missed some of our posts, or are joining us already in progress.  I looked back at all of my posts and pulled out some of my favorite tips.

21 Writing Submission Tips From 21 Beyond Your Blog Posts

1.  Make sure your content is a GOOD FIT in tone, style and subject matter, for the specific site you are submitting to.  Don’t force it, no matter how much you want to.  It won’t end well.

2.  DON’T SUBMIT COLD.  Be sure to follow, read, comment, and share on a site before submitting.

3.  Don’t leave all the promotion to the host site.  PRACTICE GOOD ETIQUETTE once you are featured by sharing/promoting your writing.

4.  READ SUBMISSION GUIDELINES CAREFULLY before submitting.  This can earn or lose you points with editors.

5.  TRY, TRY AGAIN.  If your submission isn’t accepted by a site you aspire to, don’t be discouraged.  It may take many submissions before something is a fit.

6.  A REJECTION DOESN’T MEAN IT SUCKED.  Well, sometimes it does, but it is often due to things like not being the right tone for the site, not meshing with an editorial calendar, conflicting with something similar they recently ran or other similar situations.

7.  If you’re unsure what sites to submit your writing to, check out our SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITIES for your subject matter, and use that as a starting point.  If you are still stumped, join our Facebook group and ask for feedback.

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8.  There are things you can do to help your chances of getting FRESHLY PRESSED (you must be a WordPress.com blogger – NOT self-hosted)

9.  SIDEBAR SPYING is the act of looking at the sidebars of your favorite bloggers to see where they have been featured, so that you can submit to the same places.  It’s a form of flattery.  Do it to others and appreciate when they do it to you.

10.  While not everyone is a fan of writing for The Huffington Post, many bloggers are, and there are NUMEROUS WAYS TO GET ONTO HUFFINGTON POST, including tweeting and emailing editors, the dreaded web form, and for some brave souls, emailing Arianna Huffington directly!

11.  A TEASER POST is a great way to announce to your subscribers that you have work featured on another site, and send some traffic to your host site.

12.  Gaining new followers, reaching new audiences, and building confidence are just a few of the BENEFITS GAINED FROM SUBMITTING your writing and being accepted.

13.  Having a submission rejected is not the end of the world.  There are plenty of THINGS YOU CAN DO WITH A REJECTED POST including posting it on your personal blog, submitting it to a site that’s a better fit or exchanging it as a guest post with another personal blog to name a few.

14.  If you are interested in getting your writing in print, consider starting by submitting to an anthology.  Get some inspiration from our ANTHOLOGY SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITIES.

15.  The best way to get EVERY SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITY Beyond Your Blog announces, is to join our BEYOND YOUR BLOGGERS FACEBOOK GROUP and set your notifications to all.

16.  Many editors note that good grammar and spelling, as well as tight/concise writing are very important to them when selecting what posts to feature.  Consider having at least one other person read it over after you to EDIT, and then read through it at least two more times yourself.

17.  ORGANIZE your submissions with a spreadsheet or list including when and where you submitted, and the outcome. This will help you keep from getting into a conflict with duplicate submissions etc.

18.  Be clear about your SUBMISSION GOALS, and select sites to submit to accordingly.

19.  DON’T THINK YOU CAN ONLY GO VIRAL by posting content on your own site.  Rita Templeton is a great example of that with her experience with Scary Mommy and I got a much smaller taste of that with my post on BlogHer.

20.  You don’t always have to write something brand new to submit.  There are LOTS OF SITES THAT ARE HAPPY TO FEATURE SOMETHING YOU HAVE ALREADY PUBLISHED ON YOUR BLOG.  We try to note this as much as possible in our submission opportunities.

21.  HAVE FUN.  Enjoy getting to know new sites and submitting your work.  Enjoy the competition, not with other bloggers, but with yourself and challenging yourself with new submission goals.  It’s a different and exciting way for bloggers to put themselves ‘out there’ and can lead to all sorts of opportunities!


About the Author

Susan Maccarelli

Susan Maccarelli is the creator of Beyond Your Blog, a site helping bloggers successfully submit their writing for publishing opportunities beyond their personal blogs. She also offers online training and consulting to new bloggers looking for direction on submitting their writing for publication. Susan has interviewed dozens of editors from publications like The New York Times, Huffington Post, Brain, Child, Chicken Soup For The Soul, The Washington Post, and speaks at many respected writing and blogging conferences.

2 Comments on “21 Writing Submission Tips from 21 Beyond Your Blog Posts”

  1. For me, #s 1 & 2 are extremely important and I’m still learning those. There’s a post-it in front of me where I write the ‘tone’ that I’ve observed on sites I’m dreaming of submitting to / getting published on. Is it funny and irreverent? Serious and reflective? List type or essay?…etc…It’s a lot of hard work, esp since you do need to read, comment, tweet and do what you can to NOT submit cold, as you said. So in light of that and all the stresses that go with wanting to be published on other sites, one other tip I’d like to add is for bloggers to learn to take breaks. I’ve found that stepping away and decompressing even for a day can help lessen the sense of being overwhelmed by our aspiration to get published and all the work that goes with it. So yes, #21 can’t be ignored for sure! Great summary, Susan and good luck to all of us!

  2. These are great tips! It’s so important to remember that our work is not right for every site or journal, etc. Every time I think I might be an exception . . . I am humbled. 😉

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